Oliver Ellsworth

Media Items
Personal Information
Born 
Thursday, April 29, 1745
Died 
Thursday, November 26, 1807
Childhood Location 
Connecticut
Childhood Surroundings 
Connecticut
Position 
Chief Justice
Seat 
1
Nominated By 
Washington
Commissioned on 
Friday, March 4, 1796
Sworn In 
Tuesday, March 8, 1796
Left Office 
Monday, December 15, 1800
Reason For Leaving 
Resigned
Length of Service 
4 years, 9 months, 7 days
Home 
Connecticut
Oliver Ellsworth
The Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States (Artist: William R. Wheeler (after Ralph Earl))
Biography 

Oliver Ellsworth was born and raised in Connecticut. He attended Yale College but left after two years to complete his studies at Princeton. He prepared to enter the ministry but then switched to the study of law. Ellsworth eked out an existence as a farmer while nurturing his legal practice. (In his later years, Ellsworth wrote a newspaper column on farming advice.) His practice grew as did his income.

Ellsworth held elective office in Connecticut and was later elected to represent the state at the Constitutional Convention in Philadephia. He was the co-author of the Great Compromise that offered an acceptable representation formula for small and large states. He did not sign the document, however, because he left to attend to business in Connecticut.

Ellsworth was elected senator and played a vital role in the Congress as principal author of the Judiciary Act of 1789, which spelled out the structure and function of the national judiciary.

President George Washington appointed Ellsworth to the position of chief justice. Ellsworth resigned after three years with little to have shown for his efforts. Perhaps Ellsworth's most lasting contribution while on the Court was a reduction in the practice of each justice authoring a separate seriatim opinion. Ellsworth encouraged the use of a single opinion representing the consensus of the justices. Marshall elaborated on the single-opinion concept and it later became associated with his tenure as chief justice.

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Cite this Page
Oliver Ellsworth. The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law. 13 December 2014. <http://www.oyez.org/justices/oliver_ellsworth>.
Oliver Ellsworth, The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, http://www.oyez.org/justices/oliver_ellsworth (last visited December 13, 2014).
"Oliver Ellsworth," The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, accessed December 13, 2014, http://www.oyez.org/justices/oliver_ellsworth.