FOLEY v. CONNELIE

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Case Basics
Docket No. 
76-839
Appellee 
Connelie
Appellant 
Foley
Tags
Term:
Facts of the Case 

Edmund Foley applied for a position as a New York state trooper. Although Foley was a legally admitted resident alien, state officials refused to permit him to take the examination. New York authorities relied on a statute providing that "no person shall be appointed to the. . .state police force unless he shall be a citizen of the United States."

Question 

Did the New York law violate the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment?

Conclusion 
Decision: 6 votes for Connelie, 3 vote(s) against
Legal provision: Equal Protection

In a 6-to-3 decision, the Court held that the states had an "historical power to exclude aliens from participation in its democratic political institutions" and that the New York statute did not violate the Equal Protection Clause. Noting that states need only to show some rational relationship between a valid state interest and a classification involving aliens, the Court held that the police function was "one of the basic functions of government" and thereby the province of actual United States citizens.

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FOLEY v. CONNELIE. The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law. 13 December 2014. <http://www.oyez.org/cases/1970-1979/1977/1977_76_839>.
FOLEY v. CONNELIE, The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, http://www.oyez.org/cases/1970-1979/1977/1977_76_839 (last visited December 13, 2014).
"FOLEY v. CONNELIE," The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, accessed December 13, 2014, http://www.oyez.org/cases/1970-1979/1977/1977_76_839.