POLICE DEPT. OF CHICAGO v. MOSLEY

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Case Basics
Docket No. 
70-87
Petitioner 
Police Dept. of Chicago
Respondent 
Mosley
Opinion 
Advocates
(Argued the cause for the petitioners)
(Argued the cause for the respondent)
Tags
Term:
Facts of the Case 

Chicago adopted an ordinance prohibiting picketing within 150 feet of a school during school hours; the law made an exception for peaceful labor picketing. Mosley had been picketing near a public high school; he was protesting "black discrimination." Mosley sought a declaration that the ordinance was unconstitutional.

Question 

Does the Chicago ordinance violate the freedom of speech Clause of the First Amendment?

Conclusion 
Decision: 9 votes for Mosley, 0 vote(s) against
Legal provision: Equal Protection

The exemption for labor picketing violated the equal protection clause. Government regulation of message content is presumed unconstitutional unless there are compelling justifications. And regulations that selectively exclude speakers from a public forum must undergo careful judicial examination to ensure the minimal degree of furthering an important government interest. Mosley fashions an important principle from the values of freedom and equality: equal freedom of expression.

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POLICE DEPT. OF CHICAGO v. MOSLEY. The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law. 28 September 2014. <http://www.oyez.org/cases/1970-1979/1971/1971_70_87>.
POLICE DEPT. OF CHICAGO v. MOSLEY, The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, http://www.oyez.org/cases/1970-1979/1971/1971_70_87 (last visited September 28, 2014).
"POLICE DEPT. OF CHICAGO v. MOSLEY," The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, accessed September 28, 2014, http://www.oyez.org/cases/1970-1979/1971/1971_70_87.