UNITED STATES v. U.S. DISTRICT COURT

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Case Basics
Docket No. 
70-153
Petitioner 
United States
Respondent 
U.S. District Court
Advocates
(Argued the cause for the respondents Sinclair et al)
(Argued the cause for the United States)
(Argued the cause for the respondents the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan et al)
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Facts of the Case 

Investigating three people it suspected of conspiring to destroy government property and bombing a Central Intelligence Agency office, officials used electronic surveillance to record suspects' conversations. The wiretapping was conducted without a search warrant.

Question 

Did the wiretapping violate the Fourth Amendment?

Conclusion 
Decision: 8 votes for U.S. District Court, 0 vote(s) against
Legal provision: Amendment 4: Fourth Amendment

The Court held government officials were obligated to obtain a warrant before beginning electronic surveillance even if domestic security issues were involved. The "inherent vagueness of the domestic security concept" and the potential for abusing it to quell political dissent made the Fourth Amendment protections especially important when the government engaged in spying on its own citizens.

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UNITED STATES v. U.S. DISTRICT COURT. The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law. 22 October 2014. <http://www.oyez.org/cases/1970-1979/1971/1971_70_153>.
UNITED STATES v. U.S. DISTRICT COURT, The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, http://www.oyez.org/cases/1970-1979/1971/1971_70_153 (last visited October 22, 2014).
"UNITED STATES v. U.S. DISTRICT COURT," The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, accessed October 22, 2014, http://www.oyez.org/cases/1970-1979/1971/1971_70_153.