KATZENBACH v. MCCLUNG

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Case Basics
Docket No. 
543
Appellee 
McClung
Appellant 
Katzenbach
Advocates
(Argued the cause for the appellants)
(Argued the cause for the appellees)
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Facts of the Case 

The owner of Ollie's Barbecue, in Birmingham Alabama, refused to serve blacks in apparent violation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Part of the Act prevented restaurants serving interstate travelers, or receiving a substantial amount of their food from interstate commerce, from discriminating on the basis of race.

Question 

Does a restaurant's refusal to serve blacks burden interstate commerce to an extent that Congress can legitimately prohibit such discrimination?

Conclusion 
Decision: 9 votes for Katzenbach, 0 vote(s) against
Legal provision: Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title II

The Court found that discrimination in restaurants posed significant burdens on "the interstate flow of food and upon the movement on products generally." Furthermore, argued Justice Clark, discrimination also posed restrictions on blacks who traveled from state to state. Congress's solution to this problem was appropriate and within its bounds to regulate interstate commerce.

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KATZENBACH v. MCCLUNG. The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law. 26 October 2014. <http://www.oyez.org/cases/1960-1969/1964/1964_543>.
KATZENBACH v. MCCLUNG, The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, http://www.oyez.org/cases/1960-1969/1964/1964_543 (last visited October 26, 2014).
"KATZENBACH v. MCCLUNG," The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, accessed October 26, 2014, http://www.oyez.org/cases/1960-1969/1964/1964_543.