HEART OF ATLANTA MOTEL v. U.S.

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Case Basics
Docket No. 
515
Appellee 
U.S.
Appellant 
Heart of Atlanta Motel
Advocates
(Argued the cause for the United States)
(Argued the cause for the appellant)
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Term:
Facts of the Case 

Title II of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 forbade racial discrimination by places of public accommodation if their operations affected commerce. The Heart of Atlanta Motel in Atlanta, Georgia, refused to accept Black Americans and was charged with violating Title II.

Question 

Did Congress, in passing Title II of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, exceed its Commerce Clause powers by depriving motels, such as the Heart of Atlanta, of the right to choose their own customers?

Conclusion 
Decision: 9 votes for U.S., 0 vote(s) against
Legal provision: Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title II

The Court held that the Commerce Clause allowed Congress to regulate local incidents of commerce, and that the Civil Right Act of 1964 passed constitutional muster. The Court noted that the applicability of Title II was "carefully limited to enterprises having a direct and substantial relation to the interstate flow of goods and people. . ." The Court thus concluded that places of public accommodation had no "right" to select guests as they saw fit, free from governmental regulation.

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HEART OF ATLANTA MOTEL v. U.S.. The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law. 24 July 2014. <http://www.oyez.org/cases/1960-1969/1964/1964_515>.
HEART OF ATLANTA MOTEL v. U.S., The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, http://www.oyez.org/cases/1960-1969/1964/1964_515 (last visited July 24, 2014).
"HEART OF ATLANTA MOTEL v. U.S.," The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, accessed July 24, 2014, http://www.oyez.org/cases/1960-1969/1964/1964_515.