WILLIAMSON v. LEE OPTICAL OF OKLAHOMA

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Case Basics
Docket No. 
184
Appellee 
Lee Optical of Oklahoma
Appellant 
Williamson
Consolidation 
No. 185
Tags
Term:
Facts of the Case 

An Oklahoma law prohibited persons who were not licensed optometrists or ophthalmologists to fit lenses for eyeglasses. Non-licensed individuals were also prohibited from duplicating optical instruments without written prescriptions from licensed ophthalmologists. The Lee Optical Company challenged the law, bringing a suit against the state Attorney General, Mac Q. Williamson.

Question 

Did the Oklahoma law violate the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment?

Conclusion 
Decision: 8 votes for Williamson, 0 vote(s) against
Legal provision: Equal Protection

In a unanimous decision, the Court held that while the law may have been "needless" and "wasteful," it was the duty of the legislature, not the courts, "to balance the advantages and disadvantages of the new requirement." The Court emphasized that "[t]he day is gone when this Court uses the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to strike down state laws, regulatory of business and industrial conditions, because they may be unwise, improvident, or out of harmony with a particular school of thought."

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WILLIAMSON v. LEE OPTICAL OF OKLAHOMA. The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law. 20 July 2014. <http://www.oyez.org/cases/1950-1959/1954/1954_184>.
WILLIAMSON v. LEE OPTICAL OF OKLAHOMA, The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, http://www.oyez.org/cases/1950-1959/1954/1954_184 (last visited July 20, 2014).
"WILLIAMSON v. LEE OPTICAL OF OKLAHOMA," The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, accessed July 20, 2014, http://www.oyez.org/cases/1950-1959/1954/1954_184.