Sidley Austin

Sidley Austin

One of the first law firms to have a dedicated appellate group, Sidley's appellate practice is national in scope. Lawyers in Sidley's appellate practice routinely represent clients before the United States Supreme Court, state supreme courts, federal courts of appeals and other appellate forums.

Sidley lawyers have developed a significant appellate practice throughout the federal and state courts. Since the practice began, lawyers in the firm have handled appeals in every United States Court of Appeals and in a majority of the state supreme courts.

Lawyers in the appellate group have significant experience in urging the United States to support actions taken by the firm's clients in the Supreme Court and in other courts. This important, but often overlooked, aspect of appellate practice involves advocating the client's position before the Department of Justice, including the Office of the Solicitor General, and other federal agencies and departments.

One of the practice's particular areas of experience is bringing law suits to challenge the constitutionality of state and federal laws and regulations. For example, we represented the Chamber of Commerce and the American Medical Association in challenging campaign finance disclosure requirements on First Amendment grounds. Similarly, we sued the Vice President on behalf of the Comptroller General to challenge the former's unwillingness to disclose to the General Accounting Office certain information about the Federal Energy Task Force. Sidley represented the entire railroad industry in challenging the method of disposing of mass asbestos claims in West Virginia on Due Process grounds. We are currently handling a lawsuit on behalf of General Electric against the Environmental Protection Agency in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia challenging on Fifth Amendment Due Process grounds EPA's process of imposing unilateral administrative orders to clean up CERCLA sites. Finally, Sidley has recently been retained by NBC, CBS and Fox to challenge the FCC's new indecency standards.